What is Purpura Bacca?

what is purpura bacca?We see a new phenomenon among people who are wiling to get rid of their fat. Those weigh loss enthusiasts seem that they have found a totally new solution for their problem. the name of the solution is Purpura Bacca.

Since we have limited information about this hot “weight loss” topic, we need to enlighten our readers about Purpura Bacca starting with what it is. Purpura Bacca is not a brand, it is an ingredient in a weight loss supplement. And you all know it very well actually.

Purpura bacca is “Acai Berry”. Is it familiar now? yes it is that fruit found almost in most of the weight loss/diet pills’ formulas as ingredients. Here is a quote from wikipedia for purpura bacca or acai berry:

In a study of three traditional Caboclo populations in the Brazilian Amazon, açaí palm was described as the most important plant species because the fruit makes up a major component of their diet, up to 42% of the total food intake by weight.[1]

In the northern state of Pará, Brazil, açaí pulp is traditionally served in gourds called “cuias” with tapioca and, depending on the local preference, can be consumed either salty or sweet (sugar, rapadura, and honey are known to be used in the mix). Açaí has become popular in southern Brazil where it is consumed cold as açaí na tigela (“açaí in the bowl”), mostly mixed with granola. Açaí is also consumed in Brazil as an ice cream flavor or juice. The juice has also been used in a flavored liqueur.

Today, a half-dozen brands market açaí in the beverage space.[2] Although most açaí is grown conventionally, the US company Sambazon established USDA Organic certification for their açai palm plantations in 2003 and has also implemented fair trade certification.[3]

In 2005, an article published by Greenpeace International stated that “the tasty dark violet wine of açaí is the most important non-wood forest product in terms of money from the river delta of the Amazon.”[4] In 2008, the Los Angeles Times reported that açaí is a renewable resource that can provide a sustainable livelihood for subsistence harvesters without damaging the Amazon Rainforest. The Times noted that wild harvesting of açaí may contribute to forest preservation and support of harvesting families, thereby making the forest more economical intact rather than cut down. While conventionally grown monoculture açaí farming is a threat to the rainforest, açaí has been used to successfully reforest already degraded regions.[5] In May 2009, Bloomberg reported that the expanding popularity of açaí in the United States was “depriving Brazilian jungle dwellers of a protein-rich nutrient they’ve relied on for generations.”[6]

In the regions of açaí production, such as Pará, açaí palms have replaced sugar cane and other cultivation choices more damaging to the natural environment, such as cattle farming.[citation needed] Such practices indicate that systematic cultivation and reliable commercial supplies may be more prevalent.

 

 

Nutritional content

A powdered preparation of freeze-dried açaí fruit pulp and skin was reported to contain (per 100 g of dry powder) 533.9 calories, 52.2 g carbohydrates, 8.1 g protein, and 32.5 g total fat. The carbohydrate portion included 44.2 g of dietary fiber and low sugar value (pulp is not sweet).[13] The powder was also shown to contain (per 100 g): negligible vitamin C, 260 mg calcium, 4.4 mg iron, and 1002 U vitamin A, as well as aspartic acid and glutamic acid; the amino acid content was 7.59% of total dry weight (versus 8.1% protein).

The fat content of açaí consists of oleic acid (56.2% of total fats), palmitic acid (24.1%), and linoleic acid (12.5%).[13] Açaí also contains beta-sitosterol (78–91% of total sterols).[13][14] The oil compartments in açaí fruit contain polyphenols such as procyanidin oligomers and vanillic acid, syringic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid, and ferulic acid, which were shown to degrade substantially during storage or exposure to heat.[15]